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Plant Extract-loaded Bacterial Cellulose Composite Membrane for Potential Biomedical Applications

  • Corresponding author: Muhammad Wajid Ullah, wajid_kundi@hust.edu.cn ;  Mazhar Ul-Islam, mulislam@du.edu.om
  • Received Date: 2020-09-12
    Accepted Date: 2020-11-14
    Fund Project:

    This research was supported by “The Research Council (TRC)” Oman through Block Research Funding Program (BFP/RGP/EBR/18/106).

  • Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been extensively explored as biomaterial for various biomedical applications owing to its non-toxic nature and unique structural morphology and impressive physico-chemical and mechanical properties. However, its high production cost and lack of antimicrobial activity have restricted its large-scale production and therapeutic applications. Therefore, the current study is aimed to devise a strategy for low-cost BC production and develop its composite with bioactive materials to bless it with antimicrobial activity. Herein, 5 mm thick reticulated fibrous and highly porous BC was produced by utilizing the wasted rotten tomatoes as the production medium. The produced bacterial cellulose waste (BCW) (i.e., produced from wastes) was ex-situ modified with bioactive plant extract (PE) obtained from Euclea schimperi, and the bactericidal activity of the developed BCW/PE was evaluated against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli through disc diffusion and colony forming unit (CFU) count methods. The BCW/PE composite showed high bactericidal activities against S. aureus and produced clear inhibition zone whereas negligible activity was observed against E. coli, indicating its bactericidal activity mainly against the Gram-positive bacterium. Overall, this study illustrates that there is a huge potential for developing valuable biomaterials from food wastes and utilizing their liquid holding capabilities for value-added applications in medical and pharmaceutical fields.
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Plant Extract-loaded Bacterial Cellulose Composite Membrane for Potential Biomedical Applications

    Corresponding author: Muhammad Wajid Ullah, wajid_kundi@hust.edu.cn
    Corresponding author: Mazhar Ul-Islam, mulislam@du.edu.om
  • a Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Dhofar University, Salalah, Sultanate of Oman
  • b Department of Biomedical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Fund Project:  This research was supported by “The Research Council (TRC)” Oman through Block Research Funding Program (BFP/RGP/EBR/18/106).

Abstract: Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been extensively explored as biomaterial for various biomedical applications owing to its non-toxic nature and unique structural morphology and impressive physico-chemical and mechanical properties. However, its high production cost and lack of antimicrobial activity have restricted its large-scale production and therapeutic applications. Therefore, the current study is aimed to devise a strategy for low-cost BC production and develop its composite with bioactive materials to bless it with antimicrobial activity. Herein, 5 mm thick reticulated fibrous and highly porous BC was produced by utilizing the wasted rotten tomatoes as the production medium. The produced bacterial cellulose waste (BCW) (i.e., produced from wastes) was ex-situ modified with bioactive plant extract (PE) obtained from Euclea schimperi, and the bactericidal activity of the developed BCW/PE was evaluated against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli through disc diffusion and colony forming unit (CFU) count methods. The BCW/PE composite showed high bactericidal activities against S. aureus and produced clear inhibition zone whereas negligible activity was observed against E. coli, indicating its bactericidal activity mainly against the Gram-positive bacterium. Overall, this study illustrates that there is a huge potential for developing valuable biomaterials from food wastes and utilizing their liquid holding capabilities for value-added applications in medical and pharmaceutical fields.

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