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Remedial Ability of Maize (Zea-Mays) on Lead Contamination Under Potted Condition and Non-Potted Field Soil Condition

  • Corresponding author: Uche Jenice CHIWETALU, e-mail addresses:jenice.chiwetalu@esut.edu.ng
  • Received Date: 2019-08-15
    Accepted Date: 2019-10-26
    Fund Project:

    The authors acknowledge all the authors of the references used for this study. We also appreciate Nigerian Tertiary Education Trust Found (TET Fund) for sponsoring this research work.

  • This study presents the remedial ability of maize on lead (Pb) contaminated soil. Soil samples were collected randomly from the site and subjected to physico-chemical tests before experimentation. The samples were contaminated artificially at six different concentration levels of lead nitrate (Pb(N03)2). Experimental design was 4-factorial combination (6×6×2×1). The study duration was 10 weeks, and during this period, Pb contents of the soil were analyzed in intervals of two weeks. Analyzed physico-chemical properties of the soil showed that the soil was loamy with pH 6.82, electri-cal conductivity 1.62 dS/m and adequate macro nutrient elements. The average percentage removal of Pb from the soil was 2.25% and 3.67% for potted and non-potted experiments, respectively. Similarly, the average percentage of Pb in the roots was 1.10% and 1.68% for potted and non-potted experiments, respectively. The result of this study indicated that extraction of Pb by the plant system increased with the increase of lead concentration in the soil as well as in the extent of vegetation attained by the crop. It also clearly showed that the non-potted experiments demonstrated greater influence on removal of Pb from the soil system than the potted experiments.
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Remedial Ability of Maize (Zea-Mays) on Lead Contamination Under Potted Condition and Non-Potted Field Soil Condition

    Corresponding author: Uche Jenice CHIWETALU, e-mail addresses:jenice.chiwetalu@esut.edu.ng
  • a Agricultural and Bio-resources Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Nigeria;
  • b Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nigeria Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria
Fund Project:  The authors acknowledge all the authors of the references used for this study. We also appreciate Nigerian Tertiary Education Trust Found (TET Fund) for sponsoring this research work.

Abstract: This study presents the remedial ability of maize on lead (Pb) contaminated soil. Soil samples were collected randomly from the site and subjected to physico-chemical tests before experimentation. The samples were contaminated artificially at six different concentration levels of lead nitrate (Pb(N03)2). Experimental design was 4-factorial combination (6×6×2×1). The study duration was 10 weeks, and during this period, Pb contents of the soil were analyzed in intervals of two weeks. Analyzed physico-chemical properties of the soil showed that the soil was loamy with pH 6.82, electri-cal conductivity 1.62 dS/m and adequate macro nutrient elements. The average percentage removal of Pb from the soil was 2.25% and 3.67% for potted and non-potted experiments, respectively. Similarly, the average percentage of Pb in the roots was 1.10% and 1.68% for potted and non-potted experiments, respectively. The result of this study indicated that extraction of Pb by the plant system increased with the increase of lead concentration in the soil as well as in the extent of vegetation attained by the crop. It also clearly showed that the non-potted experiments demonstrated greater influence on removal of Pb from the soil system than the potted experiments.

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